The art of boudoir portrait photography - how to choose the right photographer?

I look at boudoir and nude photography as I look at my Japanese calligraphy art. It is all about undisturbed energy flow, grace of lines and curves, and the balance between the mood and the form. It is a dialogue between the model and the space around her. I really enjoy capturing people at those unique moments when they zone out for a split second, moments when their mind is somewhere else. Then all I do is photograph the lines and shapes their body forms dressed in highlights and shadows in connection with their thought flow, linking what you can see and what you can only imagine. If you follow me on my blogs you know well that photo retouching plays a huge role in my photography art, and I absolutely love taking my time to retouch every single photo. I find the photo editing process extremely creative and exciting. I hear photographers saying so many times *I would rather be out there shooting than in front of my Pc editing*. I could not disagree with this more! Taking a photo is only a small step in a vast creative process of visualising and realising the final image. I believe that when a photographer starts using automated presets to edit 10s or 100s of photos with a few clicks of a mouse, he or she turns something that could be very unique into a very common and rather dull image. We are very jaded and consumed so much as a human race, that most of us cannot distinguish anymore between art and and a visual insult on our sensitivity. People are confused rushing through life, being too busy to take their time to think what they really like deep inside, and instead they follow the general trend appreciated by the masses. Do not be a sheep and feel it yourself. Art should not be about speed and efficiency, but the the emotion it evokes when you look at it. I do not want to have to rush through the photoshoot, which is why I set my fees to per final edited photo count and not per hour. The final result is so important for me, that I am and will refuse anyone who is approaching me for mere snapshots, or asking me to shoot for 3h and pass 50 or 70 photos to them. As an artist I actually find such requests somewhere between sad and insulting. Portrait photography is all about psychology, sparking a moment, telling a captivating story, capturing an image that will make you wonder or pause for a while, but it also has to allow one achieve artistic fulfillment. This simply cannot be rushed. It takes time to get to know who you shoot, combat their camera fear, lack of confidence, and other issues that a model or client may have. I care more about my images than those who pay for them, in fact I care so much I can take even an hour only to browse through a few shots and think which image from a series of images of a certain look I want to edit. Photo editing is a long process if done properly. A single portrait can take anywhere between 1.5 to 4 or more hours. Extremely creative portrait photography manipulations can take a whole day. There are many ways in which an image can be retouched, from a more traditional way like the one you can see below, to a fantasy theme. When you pick a photographer do not base your decision on the price, but the style and quality of his or her portfolio, the skills and passion that drives them, creativity and attention to details, and last but not least their personality. You should not only enjoy the final photos, but also the experience of being photographed. 

 Eline

Eline

Why photo editing skills are equally or even more important than photography skills?

 RAW file from the camera

RAW file from the camera

Photography is an art and one can produce stunning photos straight out of camera. However, a skillful photo editor can elevate such photos to a completely new level. Photo editing is a huge knowledge and requires a lot of patience and time, constant studies from various disciplines, including human anatomy, color management, behavior and qualities of light, etc. To edit portraiture you literally have to be a painter, in order to blend and smooth out blemishes, unflattering skin shadows and skin tone issues. Human skin is complex and it is a theater for the game of shadows and highlights. It is virtually impossible to capture a relaxed and healthy looking image without any editing process. Now there are those who take shortcuts and do lazy editing, which results in blurry skin, loosing pore details and obliterating face features, and such editing is done by photographers who either lack the skill, or those who simply prefer to bulk edit photos and move on to another client to make more money. Those type of photographer also use presets and with one click sort out 10s of photos. This also why their photographs look all the same. Photo retouching is an art, and it is way more time consuming than actual shooting. A single portrait editing can take up from 1.5 to 4h, or more, depending on which direction I want to go with it. Is it a straight forward editing, a photoshop manipulation, a creative toning, etc. The devil is hidden in details, and when you take care of the details the rest will fall into place. I work on skin pore level, often zoomed in way past 100% of the actual image size in order to correct small issues that when fixed become apparent. Good photography is always vision-driven, and the shutter click is literally the last step in capturing a good image. No matter what gear you use, how many assistants you have, if you are not in love with light and do not understand human psychology, you will not make a good portrait photographer. Then come editing skills, and those are vastly important in combining all the elements together - the vision, the captured image, understanding of your model and the ability to feel the image. Those who think that photo retouching is unnatural should ask themselves those questions: Is art supposed to be natural or appealing? Is female make-up or hair styling natural? Were Picasso's paintings realistic? Are brand items really needed? Do you like concept cars? Should we all listen to the same music? I hear a lot of photographers say "I prefer to be out there shooting than sitting in front of the PC editing". For me editing is far more creative than taking photos, and offers a true freedom of creation. Being just a photographer sounds a bit limiting to me. I need more than that.

 final edit / model: Lena

final edit / model: Lena

Low key portrait photography - harmony of light and shadows

I am not too fond of typical studio shots, with almost flat lighting on the model and plain white background. Those kind of shots are mostly used for ads in magazines, in which the model is removed from the background and the image can be manipulated in every way possible. The problem is that those kind from shots are on the boring side. The light is dull, they all look the same, there is no power, no drama, no impact. Naturally there are exceptions, like amazing models, interesting perspective or angle, great hair or makeup, or amazing fashion design that model is wearing. This is why I love dramatic and moody lighting, shadows, mystery and all that. Shadows provide another set of clothes for a model, or just a cloak if she is nude. It is quite complicated to work with speed lights in low key, as if the model moves only by one or two centimeters it can throw off the entire composition, especially if hard light is considered. Low key photography is also great for learning controlling the light in a very precise way. Once you master low key photography, you can shoot anything. Girls living in Tokyo area or models building their folio who are interested in a photoshoot like this, please message me directly and we can schedule a shoot. You do not have to be a pro.

Nude portrait photography made sensual and elegant to complement feminine charm

The less clothes your model wears the more difficult is to shoot a human form to make it look appealing and graceful. The most forgiving photoshoots are when the stylist goes bananas and the dress or whatever garment is overpowering the model, and she falls onto the second plan. Boudoir and nude photography are difficult for many reasons, and it goes both to capturing the image and editing it. Balancing of the body parts and their positioning with light and shadows, creating a light and ethereal but at the same time alluring scene, making sure that the background elements and the over composition of the image do not clash with the model and her pose, making sure that the skin tonality is even, capturing a natural body language of a model that will not hint to any discomfort of her being photographed nude, making sure that the model looks really sexy but not vulgar, and the list just goes on. Nude photography has many thin lines, and one has to be careful not to cross them.

I am currently looking for girls in Tokyo area for boudoir / nude / Chinese and Japanese calligraphy body art and cyber girl project photoshoot, please contact me if interested. You can see my full folio on my smugmug page.

 model: Lynn

model: Lynn